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Monthly Archives: April 2017

Useful Flattening Your Stomach

1. Fat Intake

How much fat is in your diet? The American Food Pyramid says that a healthy diet is one that “Emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products, includes lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, and nuts, and is low in saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars.

Following the food pyramid will help you find the fats you need in good foods like nuts and plant oils as opposed to potato chips and ice cream. You should be taking in less than 30% of your caloric intake from fat so check your labels when you’re purchasing packaged products. Many products now have the trans fats listed as well, so you can see which percentage of fat belongs to which group; saturated, non-saturated, trans, etc.

2. Carbohydrate Intake

Maybe your friends were on lo-carb diets and were amazed at the weight they lost. Maybe you tried one too? Carbohydrates are amazing in that each molecule attracts four water molecules to it and they hang out together inside your muscles. When you start decreasing the amount of carbohydrates you take in, you start to see weight loss in the form of fat loss. Oops, I mean WATER loss. No more carbs means no more four molecules of water hanging on, means lower numbers on the scale. Carbohydrate intake is essential for brain activity as well as muscle function. Our bodies feed off of glucose and glycogen which is supplied directly by carbohydrates. Eating whole wheat and whole grain is the way to go- stay away from white products; rice, pasta, bread, etc. Brown is best. Carbohydrate intake should be no more than 65% of your diet.

3. Cardiovascular Exercise

Running, cycling, swimming, aerobics; they are all using oxygen and so the prime energy source comes from muscle glycogen and fatty acids. The furnace is on and it’s burning fat. You may have heard that cardio is good for burning fat, and that is true. Cardio exercise should be done for a minimum of 20 minutes and hopefully for longer and should be done at least three times per week, hopefully more. According to the American Council of Sport Medicine, “If weight loss is your major goal, participate in your aerobic activity at least 30 minutes, for five days each week.”

You can’t melt fat off of one area specifically, but it will come off over the whole body in time. We all lose fat from different places first. Just remember that cardio is a complement to the diet and the floor work that will also do.

Information of Tight Hip Flexsors

Indicative hip flexor pain is most noticeable in activities that require power from the back, upper legs, and core. Athletes notice tip hip flexors most often when performing weighted lifts like squats and deadlifts. When flexor muscle are tight, they prevent the spine, pelvis, and hip complex from aligning properly. Tightness creates a type of body movement conservation that is contrary to having a proper full range of motion. The result is the sense of having less strength to perform movements, along with lasting, aching pain deep within the core areas of the body.

Relieving tight hip flexors and tension is not easy. It requires the application of specific stretching exercises that target the deep tissues of the body’s core. These exercises also require a bit of “nerve gliding” that can seem uncomfortable to some people.

Exercises that can unlock your hip flexors include:

Piriform Stretches

While seated on the floor, stretch one leg forward and keep one leg in a hurdler’s position. The forward leg should elongate the gluteal muscles. Gently rock forward and back, and side-to-side on the outstretched hip. This rocking motion will alleviate nerve tension and prompt the muscles of the hip to release.

Lunge Stretches

In a standing position, take a wide step so that one leg is stretched backward and the other is at a 90 degree position to the floor. This should look like an extremely long step. With an upright torso, gently push down on the elongated hip side. Try to create a “pulling” feeling in the muscles of the straight leg from the knee to belly button. Hold this position until the body begins to sink downward, then carefully switch leg positions.

Iliopsoas Palpation

Much of the tension that creates tight hips is caused by contraction of the muscles that line the pelvic bones. In order to relieve tension, palpation is necessary. This can require the assistance of another person.

Lie on a bench facing upward. Extend the body to its maximum length by outstretching the arms, and slightly twisting to one side. The person assisting the stretch should gently and carefully place a rigid hand along the abdominal muscles. Glide the touch down the midsection until the ridge of the iliac (pelvic) crest is felt. As the lying person exhales, the massage hand should gravitate inward until it reaches the underside of the iliac crest. If performed properly, the massaging hand will encounter a layer of extremely tense tissue. These are the exact muscles causing hip flexor tension and pain. Once found, the massaging hand should palpate the muscles in the same line as the length of the body. Several minutes of this deep tissue massage should cause the legs to feel freer, and the lower back to feel less curvature pressure.

Lateral Movement Drills

Lateral sled – For Those Who Need The Extra Punch

Lateral sled drag is a fantastic workout for those who need the extra punch. This workout focuses on increasing muscular strength of lower body muscles. Some treat it as a variant of the lateral lunges. However, the results delivered by the drill are promising. It is also suitable for folks that are unable to deal with deceleration stress due to hip or knee issue. Steps for correct workout are

• Stand straight
• Stretch one leg to one side
• Keep toes straight
• Pull the weight by walking sideways without changing the bending angle or body position
• Repeat with other leg / other side

Asterisks Lunges – Beat The Fear For Once And For All

Asterisks lunges upscale the benefits of regular lunges to the next level. You need two dumbbells for the workout. This drill is ideal for toning glutes and hams muscles. In addition, this workout is highly recommended for improving lateral speed. Well, footballers are you listening; beat the fear for the last time. Hit the Asterisks lunges and be the difference you deserve. Steps for correct workout are

• Stand straight
• Carry two dumbbells
• Lung as usual bending forward, 45° forward, lateral, 45° backward, and backward

Lateral Crossover Step Drill – Agility Matters When You Are Out There On The Ground

Lateral crossover step drill improves agility, stamina, and ability to turn quickly. It is a strength training drill with complete focus on improving the speed of the movements. This workout focuses on enhancing the strength, stamina, and ability to change direction with the typical side-to-side moves. You need a marker or cones for the drill. Steps for correct workout are

• Stand straight
• Take a crossover step
• Keep left foot in front of the right one
• Step right with right foot in front of the left in a crossover
• Complete the repetitions as directed
• Take a break of a minute between two sets of repetitions

Physical Fitness

Agility is what let my friend run rings around us, leaping from rock to rock along the Pedernales River in Texas. Agility is what you see in top athletes who make great skill look effortless. Agility is what helps a ballet dancer make it look effortless. Agility is how Jackie Chan can still do martial arts even while he is rolling over tables, bouncing off walls, leaping between the rungs of ladders.

I didn’t understand that until years after the hike along the Pedernales River. Now, after doing martial arts for almost 30 years, I understand. When you watch someone who moves with grace and skill, you’re seeing agility.

Have you ever had an experience where you felt clumsy?

Have you ever fumbled the ball, or tripped over your own two feet?

Or have you ever seen someone who is in great shape, but they just can’t coordinate, they can’t move?

The missing component of physical fitness is agility.

If you just do weights or cardio, you’re not going to develop agility. If you want agility, you have to move, and you have to adapt on the fly to changing (and often intense) situations.

Some sports and fitness activities promote agility more than others. For me, martial arts gave me agility. I’ve been dong WingTsun Kung Fu(TM) for 25 years, and martial arts in general for almost 30. I have to be able to adapt to what an opponent is doing quickly and perfectly. I have to seize the advantage, gain and maintain dynamic control. I have to stay balanced and graceful even while moving rapidly and adjusting to the changing dynamics of sparring.

Many other sports really develop agility as well. Basketball, tennis, soccer, hockey, skiing, snowboarding… they all develop and require agility.

If you’re not doing something to develop agility, today is a good day to start. You’ll be amazed at the difference increased agility will make in feeling physically fit. Before long you’ll move with the grace of a cat, you’ll bound like a gazelle.

Don’t just lift weights and do cardio – get out there and do something to increase your agility as well. Get together with some buddies for basketball. Go play some tennis. Take up martial arts. Agility will give you the ability to actually DO something with all of the physical fitness you’ve been developing. You will feel better and move better, and you will probably have a lot more fun than just running on a treadmill or lifting weights!